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2016 crowdfunding music

The booming live industry may be where the majority of artists make their money, but for new and emerging acts the costs of touring can still be prohibitive. In response, PRS for Music Foundation — the independent charitable arm of the U.K. collecting society — has teamed with Wigwam Acoustics and the Musicians’ Union to offer a new 72-hour flash funding initiative.

Launching today (Apr. 6) and open until midnight on Friday, British artists can apply for a “Performance Fund” that will provide four emerging acts with bespoke monitoring packages including in-ear monitoring, microphones and control system equipment worth up to £10,000 ($14,000). Successful applicants will also receive advice and training on touring, promotional support and an additional £375 ($525) to cover touring costs.

Interested artists need to submit two examples of their music and a 3-minute video answering basic questions about their live dates to the Flash Funding website. Once the deadline has closed, an industry panel will pick four artists from those shortlisted with the winners announced on April 18.

The “Performance Fund” initiative is the second in PRS for Music Foundation’s Flash Funding program, which launched in December with a novel promotion that offered five emerging acts the opportunity to get 500 12″ vinyl pressings worth over £1,500 ($2,250) free of charge. Among the winners were Belfast-based alt. jazz act Robocobra Quartet, Leeds’ post rock quartet Weirds and London rapper Barney Artist.

“Following the huge demand for our first Flash Fund, we’re pleased to announce this new opportunity for artists and bands that helps to ensure exceptional live sound while offering financial support and crucial advice,: said Joseph Frankland, PRS for Music Foundation’s senior grants and programs manager, in a statement.

“Artists rely on gigs and tours to grow their fanbase and develop their music, but too often the cost of touring can make it prohibitively tough for musicians,” added Musicians’ Union’s Kelly Wood. “It’s important that touring remains viable and that artists are supported as they perform across the great circuit of U.K. live music venues.” [Billboard]